Movies You Should Watch Because I Said So : Best of the Best, Lesser Known Gems, and Bizarre Underrated Gold (Part 1)

The long title says it all. This is basically going to be an ever expanding list of films you need to see whether they won an Oscar or have been seen by only five people. Everything included. Just straight recommendations based off what I find to be interesting and watchable. Let’s start.



Easy Rider (1969)

The road movie that started all road movies. Started the American New Wave of film making and is also just fun to watch. The campfire scene with Jack Nicholson is one of my favorites.


Harold and Maude (1971)

Seriously just one of  the best movies ever made. Harold seeks attention by staging suicide and generally being obsessed with death. Maude loves life so much that every day is an adventure. Wacky and fucking hilarious with a damn fine soundtrack.


One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

Absolute classic film starring one of the best actors of all time and a villain that truly makes your blood boil. So many great scenes. I can’t believe Brad Dourif didn’t become a gigantic star after this.


Almost Famous (1996) Available on Netflix

Essential hangout movie. You could literally put this on at any point and the movie and I’d sit an watch it. It’s the first thing I think of when I hear Tiny Dancer by Elton John. Also, Kate Hudson.


Battleship Potemkin (1925)

One of the most famous silent films of all time. The Odessa stairs sequence is historical. Pretty bloody and action filled given the year it was made. Also relatively short compared to some of the epics being made during the 20’s.


Come and See (1985)

Absolutely haunting film about Russia’s role in WWII. The main kid actor here goes through an ordeal that would have landed filmmakers today in jail. You can literally see his face become hollow and empty as the film goes on. Beats the shit out of you and never lets up. Crazy film.

MIDNIGHT COWBOY, Jon Voight, Dustin Hoffman, 1969.

Midnight Cowboy (1969)

One of the best acting displays of all time from Dustin Hoffman. Film has heart even though it’s technically a rated X film. Hey, also won best picture too. I’M WALKIN’ HERE.


Rushmore (1998)

You’ll probably see nearly every Wes Anderson film on this list. Schwartzman is perfectly cast as Fischer and Bill Murray hams it up the only way he knows how. I also think the scottish kid is one of the most underrated supporting characters in Wes Anderson films. Nobody talks about him.


Blood Simple (1985) Available on Amazon Watch Instantly

Early Coen brothers film that has SUCH A KICKASS ENDING. Great underseen noir film.


Deliverance (1972) Available on Netflix

Jokes aside, this is a great film. Everybody will remember it for the “squeal like a pig” scene but it’s really a great example of primal instinct and the will to survive. Jon Voight is a badass.


Memento (2000)

I think people forget how visionary Christopher Nolan was/is. The Dark Knight Rises and Interstellar had serious flaws but his earlier work really proved how unique his mind really is. This film is a work of intricately sculpted art.


Night of the Hunter (1955)

I’ve talked about this film extensively. It’s one of my favorite films of all time and to me, the most well filmed black and white ever. Charles Laughton could have given us magic but was cut down by inept critics. Now all we have is this masterpiece. What a loss to filmmaking.


Straw Dogs (1971)

You’re going to notice a theme. I really love Dustin Hoffman. Like, a lot. This film is one that doesn’t get seen often by modern audiences due to its, well, horrific nature. Not for the faint of heart. This film really accelerated the home invasion films of the 80s.


Assault on Precinct 13 (1976)

John Carpenter gem that takes a back seat to The Thing (For good reason albeit) but is still fucking badass and entertaining. Spawned a shit remake but the original has so much more going for it.


Cache (2005)

My favorite Michael Haneke film and therefore one of my favorite films of all time. The minimalist approach that has made Haneke famous is in full force here as we get long lingering shots that only pump up the mystery and dread of what is already a creepy as plot. Unsettling.


Das Boot

Makes you seriously wonder how they were able to film such intense and faced paced scenes while filming in such tight spaces. Epic game of cat and mouse that looks great on the directors cut blue ray that came out a few years ago. They don’t make submarine movies often, but when they do they always pale in comparison to this.


Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (2005)

Ahhh that glorious time right before Iron Man where Robert Downey Jr. was still kind of not a big deal. To me, this may be the best buddy cop movie of all time. Perfect chemistry between RDJ and Val Kilmer. I always wished for a sequel but in a way we kind of got that with The Nice Guys coming out this year. That’s another film that needs to be seen by the way.


Play Misty For Me (1971)

Vastly underrated Clint Eastwood film about a crazy bitch who really really digs listening to Clint play late night sex songs on the radio. It’s actually the first film that Eastwood directed and it shows a bit what the film is very tense and full of WOAH THIS BITCH PSYCHO moments.


Wild At Heart (1990)

Probably the most underseen and underrated David Lynch film. I had a ball with this. It has crazy violence, Nicolas Cage acting like a nutcase like always, and Willem Dafoe being super creepy which is something because Willem Dafoe is already super creepy.


Death Race 2000 (1975)

This movie is goddamn ridiculous. For those of you wondering, and I’m sure you are, yes, that is a picnic layed out with a fake baby packed with dynamite with a speeding race car heading towards it because running over pedestrians during this crazy race gets you more points. Those burgers look great by the way. David Carradine and Sylvester Stallone are in this and the cars are just so 70s. Seriously a camp classic.







Film Review : Anomalisa (2015)


IMDB Score – 7.3

Rotten Tomato Score – 92%

Metacritic Score – 88%

Directed By – Charlie Kaufman & Duke Johnson

Starring – David Thewlis, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and Tom Noonan

A man crippled by the mundanity of his life experiences something out of the ordinary.

Well, now I’m depressed.

I’ve always been perplexed and intrigued by the work of Charlie Kaufman. I always thought he was able to get down to the reality of what makes us human and what drives our emotions. I didn’t understand Synecdoche, New York but actually purchased a DVD of it in order to dive into it more. I have yet to do that. I’ve seen Being John Malkovich, Adaptation, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind once each and while I found each of them incredibly daring and inventive, there has always been something holding me back from repeat viewings. Anomalisa will most likely join that group as I honestly don’t feel a need to see it again even though I took a lot away from it. It’s a polarizing film but ultimately a very important one.

I’ve struggled with depression and issues with apathy my whole life so the aspect of the film where every looks exactly alike and sounds exactly the same hit a chord. The use of Tom Noonan’s voice for every single character besides the main two was a brilliant move from the get go but adding the fantastic Tom Noonan to play that part was just wonderful to me. He was able to really sell each and every person as a mundane boring entity who almost attack Michael Stone with the challenge of remaining engaged and interested. Have we not all felt like that at one point or another? How many conversations do we have where we completely forget afterwards because of how routine and robotic they are? I felt the mans pain. I also think that part of the reason he was so out of touch with life is because of how selfish he was. This is something I can relate to and is the main culprit for making me feel a bit shitty after the viewing. Michael is battling himself so much that every person he comes in contact with is at the mercy of his own emotions. It’s something I’ve done for years as I try to figure out my purpose and role in life. It’s not fair to others to constantly have to hold the hand of somebody who has no idea what they want out of life. I thought the film hit that theme perfectly, honestly, and without holding anything back. It may be a reason why I feel shitty but it’s also a great takeaway from a film. I like feeling something tangible after seeing a film.

The film is also extremely intimate. We’re witnessing some very real and very personal experiences in this film. It doesn’t surprise me that the most intense and intimate moments in this film are when either one of the characters, and also both at the same time, are literally stripping away the walls we keep up to protect ourselves. The film uses the bare body a lot to kind of show how fragile and private some people are. The sex scene in the film was almost too realistic to watch. I felt like I really didn’t have a place to be there with these two characters, which is kind of funny considering they were animated. It really was a job well done by both directors to portray such a moment like that in the style in which they did.

I’m not sure how I feel about the ending, which was almost as bleak as the entire film, but it’s something that left a lasting impression. Do some people have a special ability to attach themselves to other people and never lose interest or love, or do people have exciting and wild first encounters that die out emotionally and we’re left with routine and robotic relationships? It kind of reminds me of a quote from the Fincher film Zodiac. Robert Graysmith’s obsession had gone down an unstoppable path and his wife has had enough. She says it was basically “a first date that never ended”. That quote stuck with me. I think some people struggle with maintaining the passion and exciting feelings they have when they first meet somebody who stimulates them. Those feelings fade and they’re constantly trying to either recapture them or find meaning in something else. My issues are a bit different than that but I feel it’s the main theme of Anomalisa and I couldn’t help but relate to them.

I’m still depressed though. A bleak film sometimes leaves bleak aftershocks. Yet it’s definitely a window into some of the less talked about but very real emotions that a large number of people deal with. I loved the honesty and intimacy  of the film and I hope that Charlie Kaufman doesn’t take eight more years to give us another film.



I’m Back


After much travelling and adventuring, I am back. I’m working at the bookstore and trying to find a better paying job. There will be down time. So, I’ve decided to come back to you all. Posts will follow. I’m actually thinking of doing a very large multi-part segment feature numerous movie recommendations as I am quite broke and won’t be getting to the cinema much.

So look out for that. Thanks.

Film Review : Spotlight (2015)

IMDB Score – 8.3
Rotten Tomato Score – 97%
Metacritic Score – 93/100

Directed By – Tom McCarthy
Starring – Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams, Liev Schreiber, John Slattery, Stanley Tucci, Brian d’Arcy James, Neal Huff, and Billy Crudup

The true story of how the Boston Globe uncovered the massive scandal of child molestation and cover-up within the local Catholic Archdiocese, shaking the entire Catholic Church to its core.

It wasn’t too long ago that I was sitting in my Intro to Journalism class with excitement in my bones because I had finally gotten to the point where I was going to learn how to become something I’ve wanted to become since I was a kid, a journalist. Well, thanks to the very mediocre standards at a particular country college in New Jersey, that dream was, and still is, put on hold. Frankly, I wasn’t a big fan of newspaper journalism. I didn’t care about what was said in the town meeting this weekend because it most likely involved Mrs. Phelp’s rose bush and how she couldn’t expand it due to the stupid creek next to her house which should be filled up. I don’t care about Mrs. Phelps. I wanted and still want to be a conflict journalist. The real dream is travel the world and report on stories that aren’t so readily available to be told. Stories that Vice started to do before they started writing articles on what food is the best before anal sex. I wanted to expose crime and change how people saw the world. This would entail exposing the world as a dark evil place filled with criminals, but at least the rosey colored glasses would be puled back a bit. That dream has been put on hold while I try figure out my life in more immediate ways. That doesn’t however keep me from planning such adventures. They’re still present in my mind. They came back up to the surface in a big way after finishing Tom McCarthy’s 2015 film that thankfully doesn’t star Adam Sandler, Spotlight.

You read the synopsis at the top. You read the newspapers ten years ago. The Catholic Church is fucked up. Like, REALLY REALLY fucked up. My interest in this film was tied to the journalism aspect as I described in the first paragraph, but I also wanted to see how a major market film would handle this kind of subject matter. I turned out to be very pleased with how they decided to do it.

Spotlight is basically This century’s “All the Presidents Men”. Yes, I’m aware that this observation has been realized and written down by probably every single person who has ever talked about this film this year. It does however ring true. McCarthy decided to stay close to the procedural side of telling this story and skip all the shiny dressings that usually accompanies a salad like this. With Spotlight, you have just basic ingredients, except these ingredients are made with extreme care and focus. Gone are the things like romantic ties between main characters. Rachel McAdams and Michael Keaton don’t have a secret love fling. Swirling orchestral music isn’t harpooned at us whenever something emotional or powerful happens. The film lets us do all the work when it comes down to feelings and it’s to the films credit that by the end, my gut has been falcon punched into infinity. The film stands for itself and that’s really what I loved about it. The camera work wasn’t flashy but you can really notice it in small movements during pivotal scenes toward the end. McCarthy didn’t paint a new and unheard of masterpiece with his camera, rather he decided to hunker down and make every damn shot and cut count. It’s a reason why the film got nominated for editing, director, and screenplay. Those three things are what make this film special to me. It’s a technically perfect film as far as pace and tone goes, especially with the dark subject matter. It would almost be insulting to try to throw in cheesy love triangles when talking about something as serious as the rape of A LOT OF KIDS BY PRIESTS.

Speaking of subject matter, uhhhh yeah, it’s pretty horrible. The interviews with the victims and in one case, one of the men responsible, were done extremely well. McAdams does her best work here. I’m honestly a little perplexed why she got nominated for this role as I thought that Charlize Theron was phenomenal in Mad Max, but it’s not like McAdams was in any way bad. It wasn’t special to me. Mark Ruffalo however deserved his nomination. The dude killed it like he usually does. Keaton and the rest of the cast were perfect in their roles and you can’t really go wrong with casting Stanley Tucci in anything. The cast were perfect in their handling of such dark and disturbing subject matter. They were just as invested in their roles as the journalists they were portraying were in theirs.

The film is nominated for Best Picture and honestly, I wouldn’t be upset if it won. It’s not a special effects marvel like The Revenant or Mad Max, but it does what it does perfectly and that is tell the story of one of the biggest scandals of the last couple hundred years. It’s a haunting film that stuck with me for a while after I saw it and will hopefully shed a little more light on the church. My journalism path may be on hold, but I’m happy there was a film this year dedicated to the craft of reporting stories that aren’t getting any light.


Film Review : Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (2015)

Rotten Tomato Score – 82%
Metacritic Score – 74/100

Directed By – Alfonso Gomez-Rejon
Starring – Thomas Mann, Olivia Cook, RJ Cyler, Nick Offerman, Connie Britton, Molly Shannon, Jon Bernthal, and Katherine Hughes

High schooler Greg, who spends most of his time making parodies of classic movies with his co-worker Earl, finds his outlook forever altered after befriending a classmate who has just been diagnosed with cancer.

Haven’t we seen this movie like ten times in the last couple years? Coming of age film about a couple high school kids and, *gasp*, one of them has cancer and is dying. Honestly, I didn’t care that the film was about this kind of subject matter. What I care about is can the film take such a common theme and do something different. I wanted an emotional punch but I wanted the hit to come from a different angle instead of dangling it in front of me and then predictably going right for the gut. I first heard about the film when it won the Jury Grand Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. I’ve pretty much loved every single jury prize winner so that alone was enough to get me to watch this. I’ve been busy as hell since the beginning of the summer, so I finally got a chance to sit down and give this a view and I’ll be damned if the movie didn’t deliver a blowout blind shot that I didn’t see coming.

The film started out pretty standard. High school kids with more wit than a Monty Python sketch going to a high school that would never exist in this country…ever. If I had any problems with the film it was the few details such as this that irked me a bit. The high school was too surreal and played up. It really seemed like a high school out of a novel instead of a realistic depiction of what those years are like for kids. The overall tone of the film however did not come off fake and forced. This is mostly due to the stellar acting from the three leads, especially Mann and Cook. Olivia Cook played a dying girl better than anybody who has tried in Hollywood over the last decade and the emotional punches came from scenes that she was in. That isn’t to say that Mann didn’t deliver either. The scene where he talks about his regrets was especially moving and wonderfully well acted. RJ Cyler is a natural and the cameo parents and teachers were an added bonus. You really can’t go wrong making Nick Offerman your weird dad.

The direction and cinematography was top notch as well. Director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon isn’t really a well known name but I can see him being an indie favorite for a long time after this. He had help. The biggest surprise on the credits went to seeing Chung-hoon Chung as the films DP. Best known for filming pretty much everything Park Chan Wook has done, his presence was felt throughout the film with these unique filming angles that call back to films such as Oldboy and Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance.

The score of the film was also fantastic. The film took a rollercoaster right to the heart in the last 20 minutes of the movie and two pivotal scenes were punctuated by excellent song choices in “Remember Me as the Time of Day” by Explosions in the Sky and “The Big Ship” by Brian Eno. Both songs are filled with emotion and they just drove the power and emotion of the two scenes right home. It’s honestly a big reason why the film is sticking with me so much. It kind of reminds me of the end of I, Origins where music and cinematography can just send a film over the top for me. That, and the cast has to hit it out of the park, which they certainly did in this film.

There you have it. Sundance has spoken again. As mentioned before, the only real negatives of the film was some of the unrealistic and over inflated depictions of high school and some definite “I only wrote this to be unique” style dialogue. It didn’t distract though. I loved the film.